Making a hat

Hat Making – Alamosa Campus

Hat Making with Tom Hirt
8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m., July 15-19, 2019 (Valley Campus in Alamosa)
$300
Continuing Education only – not for college credit
Students will learn to use the equipment and techniques to make a hat with products that most people have or can readily get from home. Students will learn how to shape the hat by hand, ironing of the brim, sizing and hand cutting of the brim, hand pouncing and hand finishing the crown. If time allows, the class may touch on hat binding and trim by hand. Students will leave class with a completed hat and the skills needed to practice what they learned at home and make additional hats with supplies they have on hand. Tom will provide a hat box with all the tools and materials needed for each student. This class has some down time while waiting for processes to complete. To fill this time, students may bring a hat in need of repair and/or plan to make a second hat as time permits.
Tom Hirt is old-fashioned guy who does things the old fashioned way. You might call him a throw-back to a bygone era-that time when h and cowboys and craftsmen took care of business with their hands. Hirt continues that tradition to this day as a hat maker who makes superior-quality beaver felt hats one at a time by hand. Known as the hat maker for the movies, he has designed hats for many famous clients including Val Kilmer, Sam Elliot, and Sharon Stone. His credits include Tombstone, the Quick and the Dead, Conagher, and many others. After almost 20 years, he is considered one of the West’s most notable and most established hatters. Hats of the West or email Tom at info@tomhirt.com 719-372-9399

Tool/Supply List
Students will need to register no later than May 11, in order for Tom to get the materials he will need for the class. Students should contact Tom at the number above to get a complete list of other supplies [at students expense] they need to bring and provide their hat size for ordering the block, etc. Students will reimburse Tom for the cost of supplies and should contact him for pricing and to provide hat size information.

Hat made in the Hatmaking Class

Hatmaking – Trinidad Campus

Hatmaking with Tom Hirt
Class runs 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m., June 3-7, 2019 (Trinidad Campus)
$300
Continuing Ed only-not for college credit
Students will learn to use the equipment and techniques to make a hat with products that most people have or can readily get from home. Students will learn how to shape the hat by hand, ironing of the brim, sizing and hand cutting of the brim, hand pouncing and hand finishing the crown. If time allows, the class may touch on hat binding and trim by hand. Students will leave class with a completed hat and the skills needed to practice what they learned at home and make additional hats with supplies they have on hand. Tom will provide a hat box with all the tools and materials needed for each student. This class has some down time while waiting for processes to complete. To fill this time, students may bring a hat in need of repair and/or plan to make a second hat as time permits.

Tom Hirt shapes a hat
Instructor Tom Hirt shapes a hat


Tom Hirt is old-fashioned guy who does things the old fashioned way. You might call him a throw-back to a bygone era-that time when h and cowboys and craftsmen took care of business with their hands. Hirt continues that tradition to this day as a hat maker who makes superior-quality beaver felt hats one at a time by hand. Known as the hat maker for the movies, he has designed hats for many famous clients including Val Kilmer, Sam Elliot, and Sharon Stone. His credits include Tombstone, the Quick and the Dead, Conagher, and many others. After almost 20 years, he is considered one of the West’s most notable and most established hatters. Hats of the West or email Tom at info@tomhirt.com 719-372-9399

Tool/Supply list
Students will need to register no later than May 11, in order for Tom to get the materials he will need for the class. Students should contact Tom at the number above to get a complete list of other supplies [at students expense] they need to bring and provide their hat size for ordering the block, etc. Students will reimburse Tom for the cost of supplies and should contact him for pricing and to provide hat size information.

Steven Havill

Novel Writing

Guns and Gunsmithing in Fiction – Novel Writing
8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m., June 24-28, 2019
$250
Continuing Ed Only – not for college credit
Class will run from 8-5, Monday-Friday. Students should attend all classes.
This class is open to anyone interested in learning more about writing a novel on any topic and getting it published.
How to include your favorite guns and their performance in your fiction writing. This is basically a novel writing workshop, with special emphasis on the shooting sports as they are portrayed in fiction. Students will be expected to write each day, with in-class critiquing.
Special topics include how to edit productively, how to schedule your writing day, how to choose a publisher, how to deal with editors and agents, and understanding of basic concepts like plot, pace, research, character development, and much more.


About the instructor: Steven Havill, is author of 30 novels published by such firms as Doubleday, Walker and Co., St. Martin’s Press, and Poisoned Pen Press. He has taught workshops throughout the Southwest, and has been a featured presenter at such conferences as the Tony Hillerman Mystery Conference and Left Coast Crime Convention. Steven is also a 2005 graduate of the Trinidad State Gunsmithing Program

leather rifle scabbard

Gun Leather II

Gun Leather II
8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m. each day, June 17-21, 2019
$300
Does not include leather, which you will need to purchase when you arrive
Continuing Ed only – not for college credit
Gun leather II was created to expand methods and techniques learned by students in Basic Holster making. This class will take students to the next level of gun leather constructions. Students will review principles learned in Basic Holster making with emphasis on development of a gun belt, holster, and associated leather for a complete gun rig. The remainder of the class will give students the latitude to develop projects of their choice associated with guns, knives, and cartridge retention. Students will be required to provide their own firearms and knives for project development.

Bob Calkins
Bob Calkins

Robert (Bob) Calkins is an active shooter, hunter and firearms collector who has made gun leather for himself, friends, and customers for over 50 years. In 1990, he and his wife, LaVon, decided to establish 3 Cross Custom Gunleather as a part-time business. Upon retiring from the Department of the Interior in 1994, gun leather became a full-time occupation. Bob crafts gun rigs for cowboy competitors, which has included State, National, and World Champion shooters. Hunters, outdoorsmen, casual shooters, and concealed-carry holders, make up the balance of his business.
At age 75, Bob has cut back on working hours, but still produces several holsters and gun belts every week. In his opinion, there are numerous good leather craftsmen. However, he believes an individual with a true appreciation of firearms and their use is essential to building a truly functional piece of gun leather.
Bob Calkins 505-598-0208 (h) 505-716-3231 (c) or three.cross@hotmail.com

Gun Leather Tool List
Quality leather will be made available to students through the college bookstore. Costs will be based on projects to be developed. TSJC Bookstore – please contact Sandra Rodman at 719-846-5610 for information.
Needles, thread, oil, stamping tools, etc. will be furnished at no charge by the instructor.
 ¼” light weight electric drill
 Dremel tool with sanding drums
 Clear safety glasses
 Sponge and quart size water container (large butter tub is great)
 Straight edge ruler
 16: x 20” piece of ¾” plywood with smooth side
 Exacto knife with blades
 Rawhide #4 Mallet (such as Tandy #3300-04)
 Craft Tool Leather Shears (such as Tandy #3050-00)
 Grooving tool (such as Tandy 8074-00)
 Edging tool (such as Tandy #8077-03 or Osborne #127-4 preferred)
 Craft tool Overstitcher #6 (such as Tandy 8079-06)
 #14 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-14)
 #9 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-9)
 12” x 12” Granite piece (minimum 1” thick

Holster from leather class

Leather Holster Making

Leather Holster Making
Classes run 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m., June 10-14, 2019
$300
Does not include leather, which you will need to purchase when you arrive
Continuing Ed Only – not for college credit

This class was created to teach students how to construct quality gun leather using methods and techniques requiring a minimum number of leather tools. Since the work is by hand (no sewing machines, etc.) reasonable hand strength and dexterity is necessary for class participation.
Students will learn the methods I used to design, layout, stitch, wet mold, edge, burnish, apply oil or antique finish, and basket stamp holsters. As the class progresses, each student will construct two holsters for guns of their choice. I would suggest a pancake holster for a semi auto (model 1911’s are great) as well as a revolver holster of either a conventional or western design. You will have the opportunity to basket stamp one of these holsters if you so desire. Students may wish to bring two personal handguns to use in constructing these holsters (no scoped handguns, please). If time permits, we will discuss construction of gun belts, cartridge loop sewing, magazine cases, saddle scabbards, and knife sheaths.

Bob Calkins
Bob Calkins

Robert (Bob) Calkins is an active shooter, hunter and firearms collector who has made gun leather for himself, friends, and customers for over 50 years. In 1990, he and his wife, LaVon, decided to establish 3 Cross Custom Gunleather as a part-time business. Upon retiring from the Department of the Interior in 1994, gun leather became a full-time occupation. Bob crafts gun rigs for cowboy competitors, which has included State, National, and World Champion shooters. Hunters, outdoorsmen, casual shooters, and concealed-carry holders, make up the balance of his business.
At age 75, Bob has cut back on working hours, but still produces several holsters and gun belts every week. In his opinion, there are numerous good leather craftsmen. However, he believes an individual with a true appreciation of firearms and their use is essential to building a truly functional piece of gun leather.
Bob Calkins 505-598-0208 (h) 505-716-3231 (c) or three.cross@hotmail.com

Leather Holster Making Tool List
Quality leather will be made available to students through the college bookstore. Costs will be based on projects to be developed. TSJC Bookstore – please contact Sandra Rodman at 719-846-5610 for information
Needles, thread, oil, stamping tools, etc. will be furnished at no charge by the instructor.
 ¼” light weight electric drill
 Dremel tool with sanding drums
 Clear safety glasses
 Sponge and quart size water container (large butter tub is great)
 Straight edge ruler
 16: x 20” piece of ¾” plywood with smooth side
 Exacto knife with blades
 Rawhide #4 Mallet (such as Tandy #3300-04)
 Craft Tool Leather Shears (such as Tandy #3050-00)
 Grooving tool (such as Tandy 8074-00)
 Edging tool (such as Tandy #8077-03 or Osborne #127-4 preferred)
 Craft tool Overstitcher #6 (such as Tandy 8079-06)
 #14 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-14)
 #9 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-9)
 12” x 12” Granite piece (minimum 1” thick)

Red hot Damascus billet

Damascus Billet Making

Damascus Billet Making
8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m., June 10-14, 2019
$380
Continuing education only – not for college credit
This class is a hands on class for the students. This class will be focused on the making of Damascus (pattern welded) steel for use in gun hardware and knife blades. Each student should finish the class with at least one billet of Damascus steel to take home.
This focus of this class is to teach “dry welding” technique, that is the making of Damascus steel using no flux. This approach provides steel of much greater consistency and strength. We will be using gas forges to weld our steel not coal. Subjects covered will include: Dry vs. Wet forge welding, steel selection, tool selection, use of power equipment such as power hammers and forging presses, pattern development, heat treating and etching.

Steve Rollert

Steve Rollert has been a knife maker and Damascus bladesmith for 38 years.
Tool list Safety glasses Respirator either dust mask or double filter (preferred) Work apron Baseball or other brimmed hat Hearing protection Welding gloves One pair large vice grips Hammers – cross pein and ball pein of about 1.5 to 2.5 pound in weight Grinding belts – 2 each in 60, 220, 400 grit – Zircon or ceramic recommended but aluminum oxide is acceptable but will not wear as long, size: 2 inch by 72 inch in length.
Instructor will have steel available for purchase.
Please bring a refillable water bottle since we will be working around hot forges in June

red hot forge

Basic Bladesmithing

Basic Bladesmithing
8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m., June 3-7, 2019
$380
Continuing Education only – not for college credit
This class will cover the forging and grinding of both full and hidden tang blades to shape. We will cover steel selection, tool considerations, different forging approaches, several heat treating techniques, and basic finishing techniques.

Instructor Steve Rollert has been a knife maker and Damascus bladesmith for 38 years.


Tool list
Safety glasses Respirator either dust mask or double filter (preferred) Work apron Baseball or other brimmed hat Hearing protection Welding gloves One pair large vice grips Hammers – cross pein, and ball pein of about 1.5 to 2.5 pound in weight Grinding belts 2 each in 60, 220, 400 grit, zircon or ceramic recommended but aluminum oxide is acceptable, but will not wear as long, size: 2 inch by 72 inch in length.
Please bring a refillable water bottle since we will be working around hot forges and in June weather. Steel is provided by the instructor for a fee payable at the time of the class

Carved leather shoes

Leather Carving for Beginners

Leather Carving for Beginners
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a one hour lunch break, June 17-21, 2019
$300
Continuing Ed Only – not for college credit

In this beginners’ course, students will learn to build skills and refine techniques in the art of leather carving. Emphasis will be placed on the traditional methods to carve Sheridan-style patterns. At the beginning of the class, students will practice on a variety of test swatches and then advance to a main project of their choice.
Throughout this course we will cover the following:
 Pattern making and basic floral design
 Casing leather to prepare for tooling
 Transferring graphic designs to leather
 Mastering the swivel knife
 Handling the tools to stamp, emboss and carve
 Basket and geometric stamping
 Finishing your leather by dying, oiling and antiquing

Each student will be given the opportunity to experiment with different designs and tools to define their own artistic potentials. Students may bring personal items to embellish for their custom carved leather project.
Kindra Jorgenson’s love for leather craft began when she apprenticed with her grandfather, Bob Calkins.  Kindra specializes in custom carved holsters but also enjoys embellishing items with one-of-a-kind tooled leather pieces. Her passion for leather work grew into a small business, Pistols and Prayers Leatherwork. Kindra’s passions, aside from leather work, include spending time with her young daughter and family, woodworking, photography, horseback riding, shooting, hunting, and camping.
Kindra Jorgenson 505-929-4080 or pistolsandprayersleatherwork@gmail.com

Tool List
 12”x12” Granite Slab (Minimum 1” thick)
 Swivel Knife
 Leather Strop
 Mallet
 Jeweler’s Rouge
 #2 Edger
 Metal Ruler
 Water spray bottle  Stamps Include (Barry King Tool kit suggested): Basket Stamp Checkered Bevelers Bargrounders Flower Center Center Shader Leaf Liner Mule Foot Horizontal Thumbprint Lined Veiner Lined and Scalloped Veiner Scalloped Camouflage

Scrimshaw

Scrimshaw

Scrimshaw
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a one hour lunch break, June 17-21, 2019
$300.00 or 2 credit hours
(course counts toward the Gunsmithing Fine Arts Certificate)
Jim Stevens with studentLearn the Art of Scrimshaw one-on-one with Jim Stevens. You do not need an interest in Gunsmithing to take this course. The techniques taught are the same for anyone wanting to learn how to create beautiful scrimshaw on ivory, resins, and powder horns. An intensive, hands-on course taught by artist, sculptor, and scrimshander Jim Stevens. Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has three books published on scrimshaw techniques, has been commissioned to create works for collectors throughout the world, and is a Kennedy Center Registered VSA Artist in both the visual and literary arts. Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude to inspire all who attend his classes. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has been commissioned to create works of art for collectors throughout the world. Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude with him to inspire all who attend his classes, paving the way for all to express themselves in a media that warms the soul. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Visit Jim’s website or email Jim at stevens@scrimshawstudio.com
Jim Stevens

MATERIALS LIST FOR SCRIMSHAW

Learn the Art of Scrimshaw one-on-one with Jim Stevens. You do not need an interest in Gunsmithing to take this course. The techniques taught are the same for anyone wanting to learn how to create beautiful scrimshaw on ivory, resins, and powder horns. An intensive, hands-on course taught by artist, sculptor, and scrimshander Jim Stevens. Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has three books published on scrimshaw techniques, has been commissioned to create works for collectors throughout the world, and is a Kennedy Center Registered VSA Artist in both the visual and literary arts. Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude to inspire all who attend his classes. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has been commissioned
to create works of art for collectors throughout the world. Jim brings his expertise and his no- fail attitude with him to inspire all who attend his classes, paving the way for all to express themselves in a media that warms the soul. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Visit Jim’s website or email Jim at stevens@scrimshawstudio.com

SCRIMSHAW TOOL/SUPPLY LIST

The most expensive item on the following list is less than $40. I have purchased everything on the list and spent less than $100. All the items are small enough to carry in your luggage (don’t pack liquids or aerosol cans) but it is still easier to buy what you can from the College supply store. Everyone will be given time on our first day to go to the supply store and purchase materials.
The College has a first-class tool, art and office supply store on campus. It is called “The Trek- Inn Bookstore”, phone 719-846-5610. Their prices seem to be equal to or less than prices on the outside. Also, buying at the school store can definitely save you a lot of shopping or packing time. You can even give them a call ahead of time and let them know what you need so you can be assured they will have what you want when you arrive. If you already have any of these items, bring them. There’s no need to repeat your purchases.
Where to shop, source index:
(You can always order materials from the internet if you prefer.) a=school store, b=local art store or jewelry supply store or hardware store, c=local supermarket, d=local department store (like Walmart or Kmart)
Source Item
a, b One hobby knife handle (ie: X-Acto knife) (with rubber grip if you prefer)
a, b Package of #11 hobby knife blades
a, b One small tube of Titanium White artist’s oil paint
a, b One small tube of Ivory Black artist’s oil paint
a,b One #2 pencil (Mechanical pencil with fine-point HB lead also okay)
a, b One black aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
a, b One white aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
a, b One pencil sharpener (small hand held type)
a, b One roll of transparent tape
a, b One pair of scissors
a, b One pink eraser
a, b A clear plastic ruler (6 inches long is fine)
a, b One small can of spray adhesive
a, b One small bottle of rubbing alcohol
a, b One small pair of pliers
a, b One headband magnifier (ie: Opti-visor or other brand)
a, b Two sheets each of #220, #320, #400, and #600 wet/dry sandpaper
a, b One small package of .0000 steel wool
a, b One paper dust mask (to use while sanding and polishing)
a, b Safety glasses or goggles (required in school’s tool shops)
c, One small package of facial tissue
c, One package #8 size Sharps hand sewing needles
c, One small package of cotton swabs (Q-tip or other brand)
c One small package of toothpicks
d, One small flexible-neck desk lamp. (Optional – see lighting note below)
a, b One double-ended reversible pin vise (one end with zero minimum capacity)
Scrimshaw Materials: The Scrimshaw materials in-class fee is $20. This offsets some of the cost of ivory, faux ivory, Tagua vegetable ivory, cattle horn, and black buffalo horn used for special
in-class projects. This is the only in-class fee. I will have all these materials on hand when you arrive.
Headband Magnifier Note: If you have one, bring it. For those buying one for the first time, Opti-visors headband magnifiers are one of the few that come with a choice of lenses. Lens powers are designated by the numbers 3,5,7, and10. A #3 lens is 1x magnification and allows you to work about 14 inches from your material. Not much bending, but frankly not much help either. A #5 is 2x magnification and allows you to work about 8 inches from your material. I find this is fine for most work. A #10 gives 3x magnification but only about 4 inches of work distance. This is great for minute details but can be hard on the back over long periods of time. I use a #5 Opti-visor lens for general work and switch to a #10 for those times when I need the extra power for very fine details. I guess the best advice I can give new buyers is to get what you think will work the best for you and what fits your budget.
Other Types of Magnification: We will talk about Opti-visors, microscopes, thread counters, combination lamp/magnifiers, jewelers loupes, binocular loupes and other types of magnifiers during the course. If you already use any of these magnifiers (or another) and are comfortable and enjoy using what you have, go ahead and bring it.
Lighting (desk lamp note): Our classroom has good desk lighting, however you may benefit from additional lighting on your bench. This is why a desk lamp is an optional item on the materials list. Your lamp should have a flexible neck so the light can be positioned at a very low or high angle to the working surface.
Other Items: (Not required but nice. Bring them if you can.) Plastic box for your tools and supplies. Notebook and pen (For taking notes during discussions). Seat cushion for your stool (they are hard). Three old hand towels (to pad your work and your elbows and for wiping your fingers). Also bring any additional tools and/or supplies you feel you may want or need and a file folder for holding handouts.

powder horn

Advanced Scrimshaw

Advanced Scrimshaw Techniques
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a one hour lunch break, June 24-28, 2019
$300
Continuing Ed only – not for college credit

Jim Stevens with student

Jim Stevens with student

Learn advanced scrimshaw techniques one-on-one with Jim Stevens. You do not need an interest in Gunsmithing to take this course. The techniques taught are the same for anyone wanting to learn how to create beautiful scrimshaw. This course goes beyond basic scrimshaw into areas of specialized tool making, colored scrimshaw, carving, and even scrimshaw inlay art. The world of scrimshaw covers a much broader range of art than just etching images in black ink. This is an intensive, hands-on course taught by artist, sculptor, and scrimshander Jim Stevens. Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has three books published on scrimshaw techniques and has been commissioned to create works for collectors throughout the world. He is a Kennedy Center Registered VSA Artist in both the visual and literary arts and brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude to inspire all who attend his classes. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Pre-Requisite: Scrimshaw class or consent of instructor. Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has been commissioned to create works of art for collectors throughout the world. Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude with him to inspire all who attend his classes, paving the way for all to express themselves in a media that warms the soul. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Visit Jim’s website at http://scrimshawstudio.com/ or email Jim at stevens@scrimshawstudio.com

MATERIALS LIST FOR SCRIMSHAW

Learn the Art of Scrimshaw one-on-one with Jim Stevens. You do not need an interest in Gunsmithing to take this course. The techniques taught are the same for anyone wanting to learn how to create beautiful scrimshaw on ivory, resins, and powder horns. An intensive, hands-on course taught by artist, sculptor, and scrimshander Jim Stevens. Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has three books published on scrimshaw techniques, has been commissioned to create works for collectors throughout the world, and is a Kennedy Center Registered VSA Artist in both the visual and literary arts. Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude to inspire all who attend his classes. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has been commissioned
to create works of art for collectors throughout the world. Jim brings his expertise and his no- fail attitude with him to inspire all who attend his classes, paving the way for all to express themselves in a media that warms the soul. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Visit Jim’s website or email Jim at stevens@scrimshawstudio.com

SCRIMSHAW TOOL/SUPPLY LIST

The most expensive item on the following list is less than $40. I have purchased everything on the list and spent less than $100. All the items are small enough to carry in your luggage (don’t pack liquids or aerosol cans) but it is still easier to buy what you can from the College supply store. Everyone will be given time on our first day to go to the supply store and purchase materials.
The College has a first-class tool, art and office supply store on campus. It is called “The Trek- Inn Bookstore”, phone 719-846-5610. Their prices seem to be equal to or less than prices on the outside. Also, buying at the school store can definitely save you a lot of shopping or packing time. You can even give them a call ahead of time and let them know what you need so you can be assured they will have what you want when you arrive. If you already have any of these items, bring them. There’s no need to repeat your purchases.
Where to shop, source index:
(You can always order materials from the internet if you prefer.) a=school store, b=local art store or jewelry supply store or hardware store, c=local supermarket, d=local department store (like Walmart or Kmart)
Source Item
a, b One hobby knife handle (ie: X-Acto knife) (with rubber grip if you prefer)
a, b Package of #11 hobby knife blades
a, b One small tube of Titanium White artist’s oil paint
a, b One small tube of Ivory Black artist’s oil paint
a,b One #2 pencil (Mechanical pencil with fine-point HB lead also okay)
a, b One black aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
a, b One white aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
a, b One pencil sharpener (small hand held type)
a, b One roll of transparent tape
a, b One pair of scissors
a, b One pink eraser
a, b A clear plastic ruler (6 inches long is fine)
a, b One small can of spray adhesive
a, b One small bottle of rubbing alcohol
a, b One small pair of pliers
a, b One headband magnifier (ie: Opti-visor or other brand)
a, b Two sheets each of #220, #320, #400, and #600 wet/dry sandpaper
a, b One small package of .0000 steel wool
a, b One paper dust mask (to use while sanding and polishing)
a, b Safety glasses or goggles (required in school’s tool shops)
c, One small package of facial tissue
c, One package #8 size Sharps hand sewing needles
c, One small package of cotton swabs (Q-tip or other brand)
c One small package of toothpicks
d, One small flexible-neck desk lamp. (Optional – see lighting note below)
a, b One double-ended reversible pin vise (one end with zero minimum capacity)
Scrimshaw Materials: The Scrimshaw materials in-class fee is $20. This offsets some of the cost of ivory, faux ivory, Tagua vegetable ivory, cattle horn, and black buffalo horn used for special in-class projects. This is the only in-class fee. I will have all these materials on hand when you arrive.
Headband Magnifier Note: If you have one, bring it. For those buying one for the first time, Opti-visors headband magnifiers are one of the few that come with a choice of lenses. Lens powers are designated by the numbers 3,5,7, and10. A #3 lens is 1x magnification and allows you to work about 14 inches from your material. Not much bending, but frankly not much help either. A #5 is 2x magnification and allows you to work about 8 inches from your material. I find this is fine for most work. A #10 gives 3x magnification but only about 4 inches of work distance. This is great for minute details but can be hard on the back over long periods of time. I use a #5 Opti-visor lens for general work and switch to a #10 for those times when I need the extra power for very fine details. I guess the best advice I can give new buyers is to get what you think will work the best for you and what fits your budget.
Other Types of Magnification: We will talk about Opti-visors, microscopes, thread counters, combination lamp/magnifiers, jewelers loupes, binocular loupes and other types of magnifiers during the course. If you already use any of these magnifiers (or another) and are comfortable and enjoy using what you have, go ahead and bring it.
Lighting (desk lamp note): Our classroom has good desk lighting, however you may benefit from additional lighting on your bench. This is why a desk lamp is an optional item on the materials list. Your lamp should have a flexible neck so the light can be positioned at a very low or high angle to the working surface.
Other Items: (Not required but nice. Bring them if you can.) Plastic box for your tools and supplies. Notebook and pen (For taking notes during discussions). Seat cushion for your stool (they are hard). Three old hand towels (to pad your work and your elbows and for wiping your fingers). Also bring any additional tools and/or supplies you feel you may want or need and a file folder for holding handouts.

Introductory Hand Engraving

Introductory Hand Engraving
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a one hour lunch break, June 10-14, 2019
$380 or 3 credit hours
**Note** In order for this course to meet the requirements for the Gunsmithing Arts Certificate, classes will run longer each day. Students should report for orientation at 8 a.m. Monday morning. Dr. Pierson will discuss extended class time at the beginning of the course.
(This course counts toward the Gunsmithing Fine Arts Certificate)

Dr. Michael J. PiersonThis course covers basic concepts and skills related to hammer and chisel engraving. Special emphasis will be placed on tool sharpening, pattern theory, designing, transferring, and cutting patterns.

Dr. Michael J. Pierson has been an academic administrator and taught technical subjects in a university setting for over 35 years. He has been engraving for 24 years, was trained by Frank Hendricks, and is a member of the Firearms Engraver’s Guild of America. He is proficient with both the hammer and chisel and pneumatic engraving techniques and a wide variety scroll patterns.

(Please keep in mind that the tools suggested for each class are the minimum tools you should bring. Please feel free to bring any additional tools you feel you may need)

 

Required tools and supplies:
1. Chasing hammer, 1-1/8″ face from NGraver or GRS
2. Four 3/32” carbalt XD blanks from Lindsay
3. #7, #12, #20 straight liners in standard width from NGraver or #18-10 and #24-10 straight liners from GRS
4. Steel ruler, 6 inch
5. Dividers
6. Scribe
7. Ellipse template #20750 from Drafting Steals
8. Circle template #20724 from Drafting Steals
9. Stabilio # 8008 pencilfrom Amazon
10. Curved burnisher from Amazon
11. Dot punch set, No. 1, 2, 3 from NGraver or beading tool #10, #15, and #22 from GRS
12. Optivisor, #3 lens from GRS
13. Talcum powder
14. Clear packaging tape
15. Money clip, nickel silver spring tempered from Ngraver
16. One tube of oil based black etching ink from Faust or Eckersleys
17. Stainless tool holder for 3/32” graver blanks from Lindsay
18. Wet/dry silicon carbide sandpaper (220,320, & 400 grit)
19. Palm push adjustable length graver from Lindsay
20. 3/16” brass punch from MSC
21. 3/16” steel punch from MSC
22. Carbide bur set #004-511 from GRS

Contact information for tool and supply sources:
GRS Tools Ngraver Company
Lindsay Engraving
Rudolph Faust, Inc.
Eckersley’s Arts and Crafts
MSC Industrial Supply

Engraved metal plates

Advanced Hand Engraving

Advanced Hand Engraving
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. with an hour lunch break, June 17-21, 2019
$380 or 3 credit hours
**Note** In order for this course to meet the requirements for the Gunsmithing Arts Certificate, classes will run longer each day. Students should report for orientation at 8 a.m. Monday morning. Dr. Pierson will discuss extended class time at the beginning of the course.
(This course counts toward  the Gunsmithing Fine Arts Certificate)

This course covers advanced concepts and skills related to push engraving and hammer and chiselDr. Michael J. Pierson engraving. Special emphasis will be placed on scroll types, precious metal inlay, bulino and banknote engraving, restoring engraving, and lettering. Students should complete the Introductory Hand Engraving course prior to enrolling Advanced Hand Engraving.

Dr. Michael J. Pierson has been an academic administrator and taught technical subjects in a university setting for over 35 years. He has been engraving for 24 years, was trained by Frank Hendricks, and is a member of the Firearms Engraver’s Guild of America. He is proficient with both the hammer and chisel and pneumatic engraving techniques and a wide variety scroll patterns.

 

Advanced Hand Engraving Tool List

1. Chasing hammer, 1-1/8″ face from NGraver or GRS
2. Four 3/32” carbalt XD blanks from Lindsay
3. #7, #12, #20 straight liners in standard width from NGraver or #18-10 and #24-10 straight liners from GRS
4. Steel ruler, 6 inch
5. Dividers
6. Scribe
7. Ellipse template #20750 from Drafting Steals
8. Circle template #20724 from Drafting Steals
9. Stabilio # 8008 pencilfrom Amazon
10. Curved burnisher from Amazon
11. Dot punch set, No. 1,2,3 from NGraver or beading tool #10, #15, and #22 from GRS
12. Optivisor, #3 lens from GRS
13. Talcum powder
14. Clear packaging tape15. Money clip, nickel silver spring tempered from Ngraver
16. One tube of oil based black etching ink from Faust or Eckersleys
17. Stainless tool holder for 3/32” graver blanks from Lindsay
18. Wet/dry silicon carbide sandpaper (220,320, & 400 grit)
19. Palm push adjustable length graver from Lindsay
20. 3/16” brass punch from MSC
21. 3/16” steel punch from MSC
22. Carbide bur set #004-511 from GRS

Tool supply sources

GRS Tools

Ngraver Company

Lindsay Engraving

Rudolph Faust, Inc.

Eckersley’s Arts and Crafts

MSC Industrial Supply

Example of metal embossing on copper sheet

Canceled — Metal Embossing Valley Campus

THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELED.  Friday, May 18, 2018
9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Valley Campus, Room 120

$130 (includes most supplies for the class)
Continuing Ed only – not for college credit

Metal embossing or repujado (in Spanish), is the old-world art of shaping soft metal sheets into intricate designs. Embossing design motifs are found throughout Southern Colorado and Northern New Mexico on cemetery(camposanto) headstones, carved wood mission doors and tinwork.
In this beginner metal embossing class, students will learn to use a variety of basic tools to emboss three different types of metal, creating three different projects reflecting traditional design, tools and local history. Metals will include humble aluminum, rich copper and lustrous pewter!

Portrait of Libby Rehm

Libby Rehm

Instructor: Ten years ago, Libby Rehm (Elegant Elk Studios) discovered metal embossing, the fine art of shaping and texturing of metals. While exploring Southern Colorado’s Dolores Cemetery, Libby noticed the similarities between the design elements of Spanish/New Mexican embossing and the hand-carved designs in Spanish sandstone grave markers. This “discovery” has led Libby on a years-long quest to ferret out the fading, crumbling designs found among walled Colonial Mexican era camposantos, family moradas, mission chapel tin works, wood carvings, and ghost towns sprinkled across Southern Colorado and New Mexico.
In addition to her expertise in metal embossing, Libby is a juried photographer and mixed media artist. Samples of her artwork can be found on her Elegant Elk Studios Facebook page: facebook.com/ElegantElkStudios/, her website: www.Libbyrehm.com, and Squareup store: https://squareup.com/store/elegantelkstudios.

 

 

 

Metal Embossing Supply List
Need to bring:

Xacto knife with extra blades. # 11 works well

Metal or steel edge ruler, 12 to 18 inches long

Sharpie fine point permanent marker (darker is better, i.e. black, blue, red)

Pencil/pen/note paper

White Eraser
Nice to have:

Any metal embossing tools you already have, i.e. 9”x12” Plexiglas, small suede, stylus

Masking tape, low tack (I.e. painter’s blue or green)

Bone or teflon folder (if you have one, don’t go buy one)

Scissors (craft ones like Fiskars, not your best sewing shears!)

Cutting mat (8×10 or there about)
Bring your own lunch, beverage and non-spill mug!
If you have questions, please feel free to give Libby a call or email:
970-577-0390, lrehm@q.com

To register or get more information contact Donna Haddow, donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu, 719 846-5724.

carved gun stock

Gunstock Carving

Decorative Gun Stock Carving class with Jack Brooks
$650
July 30 – August 3, 2018
This five day class will be a study of traditional decorative carving as found on 18th century American flintlock rifles. Students will learnto carve both incise and relief designs in the manner of old masters from Christian’s Spring, Lancaster, and Allentown, Pennsylvania. Jack will furnish practice butt stock pieces that each student will carve and be able to take home as future reference.  Students will need their own set of carving tools.

jack brooksJack Brooks was born in Colorado, graduated from Englewood High School in 1966, and attended University of Northern Colorado where he majored in  chemistry (BA 1970 and MA1972). He built his first flintlock rifle in 1971. After working four years as a chemist he beganmaking flintlock rifles full time in 1976. Besides making new rifles, pistols, and fowlers; he began collecting and restoring antique Kentucky rifles. This gave Jack the opportunity to study firsthand the finest examples of 18th and 19th century American long rifles. His interest in Kentucky rifles began when a child with Walt Disney’s Davy Crockett TV series and John Wayne’s movie “The Alamo”. Many years later Jack, along with friends Bob Lienemann and Mike Branson, were asked to make 14 guns for the 2004 remake of “The Alamo” movie. Jack’s work has been displayed at The Smithsonian Institute, the NRA Museum, and the Minneapolis Institute of Art. His guns have also been featured in several magazines and books. Jack has authored many magazine articles and has taught several years at the annual Gunsmith Seminar of the National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association.

To register contact Donna Haddow, 800 621 TSJC Ext. 5724 or 719 846-5724 or donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu
Line drawing of chairs

I can only draw stick figures (art series)

Drawing classes run on the first three Wednesdays of the month, February through June,Line drawing of chairs 6 – 8 p.m., Berg 401 – Trinidad
$25 per 2-hour session, or $60 if you sign up for all three sessions of the month.

Overturn past experiences and grow as an observant human. With these workshops we will investigate the fundamental skills and techniques of drawing. You will learn to free your hand so that the mind can guide, your eyes will start to see and your skills will soar.
Although this workshop accommodates beginners, all levels are very welcome. Come get out of your artistic block, find fellow artists, and experience a new inspirational environment!

Drawing supplies will be provided but feel free to bring your own supplies.

February 7, 14, and 21
Free the hand so the art can follow: Mark Making 101

March 7, 14, and 21
Get Some Perspective: The Creation of Space

April 4, 11, and 18
The Great Value of Value: Light Form and Texture

May 2, 9, and 16
All the Pretty Colors, Part I:
Color Theory and Dry Media Mixing

June 6, 13, and 20
All the Pretty Colors, Part II: Expression and Use of Color

Instructor Ily S. Reiling

Instructor: Ily S. Reiling has lived and worked as an artist in Colorado for over 20 years. She has received her BFA from Metropolitan State University in Denver and her MA from The University of Denver. Ily has shown her work locally, nationally, and internationally, but her true love is working closely with her community to make beautiful things and lasting relationships. She has found the best way of doing this is through education. She has over 15 years of teaching experience which includes all ages, levels, and focuses.

To register, contact Donna
at (719) 846-5724 or
donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu

 

Tom Hirt shapes a hat

Hatmaking (Alamosa Campus)

Hatmaking July 16 – 20, 2018

 $300

Continuing Education only — not for college credit

THIS CLASS IS OFFERED AT OUR SAN LUIS VALLEY CAMPUS IN ALAMOSA, COLORADO.  Our Valley Campus is located at 1011 Main Street in Alamosa.  The same class will be offered in Trinidad June 4 – 8, 2018.  Click here for more information on the Trinidad Hatmaking Class.

Students will learn to use the equipment and techniques to make a hat with products that most people have or can readily get from home.  Students will learn how to shape the hat by hand, ironing of the brim, sizing and hand cutting of the brim, hand pouncing and hand finishing the crown. If time allows, the class may touch on hat binding and trim by hand.  Students will leave class with a completed hat and the skills needed to practice what they learned at home and make additional hats with supplies they have on hand.  Tom will provide a hat box with all the tools and materials needed for each student.  This class has some down time while waiting for processes to complete.  To fill this time, students may bring a hat in need of repair and/or plan to make a second hat as time permits.

Tom Hirt

Tom Hirt

Tom Hirt is old-fashioned guy who does things the old fashioned way.  You might call him a throw-back to a bygone era-that time when h and cowboys and craftsmen took care of business with their hands.  Hirt continues that tradition to this day as a hat maker who makes superior-quality beaver felt hats one at a time by hand.  Known as the hat maker for the movies, he has designed hats for many famous clients including Val Kilmer, Sam Elliot, and Sharon Stone.  His credits include Tombstone, the Quick and the Dead, Conagher, and many others.  After almost 20 years, he is considered one of the West’s most notable and most established hatters.  Hats of the West or email Tom at info@tomhirt.com  719-372-9399

 

 

 

 

 

Students will need to register no later than May 11th in order for Tom to get the materials he will need for the class. Students should contact Tom at the number above to get a complete list of other supplies [at students expense] they need to bring and provide their hat size for ordering the block, etc.  Students will reimburse Tom for the cost of supplies and should contact him for pricing and to provide hat size information.

Introduction to Beekeeping

February 3, 10 and 17, 2018 from 9 a.m. to noon each day

Total cost for all three classes is $60.  Included educational materials and a trip.

Trinidad State Junior College Campus, Berg Building, Room 401

Bee hive with beesSession one (February 3).  Learn the origin of bees and an overview of the European honey bee and where it fits in the world of bees.  There are different races of bees — which is right for you?  The unique biology of bees, what jobs do bees have in the hive and who’s in charge?

Session two (February 10).  Essential equipment needed for beekeepers, when and where to order your bees to get your hive started.  What does a beekeeper do?  Dealing with problems including Colony Collapse Disorder, parasites, predators, pathogens, pesticides and nutrition.

Session three (February 17).  Beekeeping through the seasons, ranging from feeding bees to harvesting honey.  Ways to nurture your bees and the economics of beekeeping.  Since February is too cold to work a hive, we’ll provide opportunities for students to visit an apiary and “work the bees” in April an/or May.  This lesson covers safety, review of equipment, hive placement and more.

Contact Donna Haddow to register at 719 846-5724 or donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu.

The instructor if Jim Conley.  He’s a former Huerfano County Extension Agent and a retired International Development Specialist with the USDA’s Foreign Agriculture Service.

box made of oak

Wooden Boxes

Wooden Boxes
July 9 – 13, 2018  $300

clint litseyContinuing Education Only – not for college credit
This class covers hand tool sharpening as well as machine techniques and use. The class focuses on corner construction used to build display cases, pistol boxes and fine toolboxes. Students will takes completed projects home.

Clint Litsey is a lifetime hobby woodworker. Clint’s main focus is chest and box construction. Clint also builds a few tables and some church furniture.

Required Tools
Safety glasses
Combination square
Utility knife
Mallet or hammer
Phillips screwdrivers
Measuring tape

powder horn

Advanced Scrimshaw

Advanced Scrimshaw Techniques
July 23 – 27, 2018  $300
Continuing Ed only – not for college credit

Learn advanced scrimshaw techniques one-on-one with Jim Stevens. You do not need an interest in Gunsmithing to take this course. The techniques taught are the same for anyone wanting to learn how to create beautiful scrimshaw. This course goes beyond basic scrimshaw into areas of specialized tool making, colored scrimshaw, carving, and even scrimshaw inlay art. The world of scrimshaw covers a much broader range of art than just etching images in black ink. This is an intensive, hands-on course taught by artist, sculptor, and scrimshander Jim Stevens.

Jim Stevens with studentJim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has three books published on scrimshaw techniques and has been commissioned to create works for collectors throughout the world. He is a Kennedy Center Registered VSA Artist in both the visual and literary arts and brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude to inspire all who attend his classes. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Pre-Requisite: Scrimshaw class or consent of instructor.

Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has been commissioned to create works of art for collectors throughout the world. Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude with him to inspire all who attend his classes, paving the way for all to express themselves in a media that warms the soul. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Visit Jim’s website at http://scrimshawstudio.com/ or email Jim at stevens@scrimshawstudio.com

Tool List
One hobby knife handle (ie: X-Acto knife) (with rubber grip if you prefer)
Package of 5, #11 hobby knife blades
69
One small tube of Titanium White artist’s oil paint
One small tube of Ivory Black artist’s oil paint
Mechanical pencil with fine-point HB lead
One #2 pencil
One black aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
One white aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
One pencil sharpener (small hand held type)
One roll of transparent tape
One pair of scissors
One pink eraser
A clear plastic ruler (6 inches long is fine)
One small can of spray adhesive
One small can of artist’s spray fixative
One small bottle of rubbing alcohol
One small pair of pliers
One small sharpening stone
Three sheets each of #400 and #600 wet/dry sandpaper
One small package of .0000 steel wool
One paper dust mask (to use while sanding and polishing)
Safety glasses or goggles (required in school’s tool shops)
One small package of facial tissue
One package of assorted fine point, hand sewing needles
One small package of cotton swabs (Q-tip or other brand)
One double-ended reversible pin vise (one end with zero minimum capacity)
*Hand-held rotary tool with small selection of ball burrs
**Headband Magnifier
*Rotary Tool Note: There are many brands of rotary tools with Dremel probably being the best-known name brand, but there are other brands out there and as long as you are comfortable with it, whichever one you choose will be fine. You don’t need an expensive one. Also, you only need a small selection of smaller ball burrs for your rotary tool. You can find them in sets of 5 to 10 for a reasonable price.
**Headband Magnifier Note: For those buying one for the first time, Opti-visors headband magnifiers are a popular choice and one of the few that come with a choice of lenses. Lens powers are designated by the numbers 3,5,7, and10. A #3 lens is 1x magnification and allows you to work about 14 inches from your material. Not much bending, but frankly not much help either. A #5 is 2x magnification and allows you to work about 8 inches from your material. I find this is fine for most work. A #10 gives 3x magnification but only about 4 inches of work distance. This is great for minute details but can be hard on the back over long periods of time. I use a #5 Opti-visor lens for general work and switch to a #10 for those times when I need the extra power for very fine details. I guess the best advice I can give new buyers is to get what you think will work the best for you and what fits your budget. Other types of magnification include microscopes, thread counters, combination lamp/magnifiers, jewelers loupes, binocular loupes and other types of magnifiers during the
course. If you already use any of these magnifiers (or another) and are comfortable and enjoy using what you have, go ahead and bring it.

Scrimshaw

Scrimshaw

July 16 – 20, 2018
$300.00 or 2 credit hours
(course counts toward the Gunsmithing Fine Arts Certificate)

Learn the Art of Scrimshaw one-on-one with Jim Stevens. You do not need an interest in Gunsmithing to take this course. The techniques taught are the same for anyone wanting to learn how to create beautiful scrimshaw on ivory, resins, and powder horns. An intensive, hands-on course taught by artist, sculptor, and scrimshander Jim Stevens. Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has three books published on scrimshaw techniques, has been commissioned to create works for collectors throughout the world, and is a Kennedy Center Registered VSA Artist in both the visual and literary arts. Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude to inspire all who attend his classes. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.

 

Jim Stevens with student

Jim Stevens with student

Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has been commissioned to create works of art for collectors throughout the world. Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude with him to inspire all who attend his classes, paving the way for all to express themselves in a media that warms the soul. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Visit Jim’s website or email Jim at stevens@scrimshawstudio.com

 

 

SCRIMSHAW TOOL/SUPPLY LIST
The most expensive item on the following list is less than $40. I have purchased everything on the list and spent less than $100. All the items are small enough to carry in your luggage (don’t pack liquids or aerosol cans) but it is still easier to buy what you can from the College supply store. Everyone will be given time on our first day to go to the supply store and purchase materials.
The College has a first-class tool, art and office supply store on campus. It is called “The Trek-Inn Bookstore”, phone 719-846-5610. Their prices seem to be equal to or less than prices on the outside. Also, buying at the school store can definitely save you a lot of shopping or packing time. You can even give them a call ahead of time and let them know what you need so you can be assured they will have what you want when you arrive. If you already have any of these items, bring them. There’s no need to repeat your purchases.

Where to shop, source index:
(You can always order materials from the Internet if you prefer.) a=school store, b=local art store or jewelry supply store or hardware store, c=local supermarket, d=local department store (like Walmart or Kmart)
MATERIALS FOR SCRIMSHAW
Source Item
a, b One hobby knife handle (ie: X-Acto knife) (with rubber grip if you prefer)
a, b Package of 5, #11 hobby knife blades
a, b One small tube of Titanium White artist’s oil paint
a, b One small tube of Ivory Black artist’s oil paint
a,b One #2 pencil
a, b One black aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
a, b One white aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
a, b One pencil sharpener (small hand held type)
a, b One roll of transparent tape
a, b One pair of scissors
a, b One pink eraser
a, b A clear plastic ruler (6 inches long is fine)
a, b One small can of spray adhesive
a, b One small bottle of rubbing alcohol
a, b One small pair of pliers
a, b One headband magnifier (ie: Opti-visor) (see note below)
a, b Three sheets each of #400 and #600 wet/dry sandpaper
a, b One package of .0000 steel wool pads
a, b One paper dust mask (to use while sanding and polishing)
a, b Safety glasses or goggles (required in school’s tool shops)
c, One small package of facial tissue
c, One package of assorted fine point, hand sewing needles
c, One small package of cotton swabs (Q-tip or other brand)
d, One small flexible-neck desk lamp. (see lighting note below)
a, b One double-ended reversible pin vise (one end with zero minimum capacity)
The Scrimshaw in-class fee is $12. This covers the cost of ivory, Tagua vegetable ivory, cattle horn, black buffalo horn, and other materials that I will have on hand for special in-class projects. This is the only in-class fee. I will have all these materials on hand when you arrive.
Headband Magnifier Note: If you have one, bring it. For those buying one for the first time, Opti-visors headband magnifiers are one of the few that come with a choice of lenses. Lens powers are designated by the numbers 3,5,7, and10. A #3 lens is 1x magnification and allows you to work about 14 inches from your material. Not much bending, but frankly not much help either. A #5 is 2x magnification and allows you to work about 8 inches from your material. I find this is fine for most work. A #10 gives 3x magnification but only about 4 inches of work distance. This is great for minute details but can be hard on the back over long periods of time. I use a #5 Opti-visor lens for general work and switch to a #10 for those times when I need the extra power for very fine details. I guess the best advice I can give new buyers is to get what you think will work the best for you and what fits your budget.
Other Types of Magnification: We will talk about opti-visors, microscopes, thread counters, combination lamp/magnifiers, jewelers loupes, binocular loupes and other types of magnifiers during the course. If you already use any of these magnifiers (or another) and are comfortable and enjoy using what you have, go ahead and bring it.
Lighting (desk lamp note): Our classroom has good overhead light, however you’ll soon learn that you need additional lighting on your bench. This is why a desk lamp is on the materials list. Your lamp should have a flexible neck and use a regular incandescent or low power tungsten bulb. What you want is a lamp whose light can be positioned at a very low angle to the bench, with the back of the lamp pointed towards you while reflecting light off the material you are working on.
Other Items: (Not required but nice. Bring them if you can.) Plastic box for your tools and supplies. Notebook and pen (For taking notes during discussions). Seat cushion for your stool (they are hard). Three old hand towels (to pad your work and your elbows and for wiping your fingers). Also bring any additional tools and/or supplies you feel you may want or need, any artwork or pictures you would like to work from, and a file folder for holding handouts.
Scrimshaw Class Final Project: For your final project you will need to purchase and bring with you the material you want to use. If you do not bring your own material for your final project, you may select from what I will have on hand.
I have no business relationship with them, but The Boone Trading Company is a reputable company that has any material you may want for your final project. Their number is 1-800-423-1945. Your final piece should be a belt buckle, pendant, money clip, or similar item. I recommend a flat blank rather than a domed cabochon, since domed cabochons are harder for beginners, but a domed cabochon will still be okay if that is what you prefer. Also, for pendants, order a pendant at least 30-40mm in length.