Tom Hirt shapes a hat

Hatmaking (Alamosa Campus)

Hatmaking July 16 – 20, 2018

 $300

Continuing Education only — not for college credit

THIS CLASS IS OFFERED AT OUR SAN LUIS VALLEY CAMPUS IN ALAMOSA, COLORADO.  Our Valley Campus is located at 1011 Main Street in Alamosa.  The same class will be offered in Trinidad June 4 – 8, 2018.  Click here for more information on the Trinidad Hatmaking Class.

Students will learn to use the equipment and techniques to make a hat with products that most people have or can readily get from home.  Students will learn how to shape the hat by hand, ironing of the brim, sizing and hand cutting of the brim, hand pouncing and hand finishing the crown. If time allows, the class may touch on hat binding and trim by hand.  Students will leave class with a completed hat and the skills needed to practice what they learned at home and make additional hats with supplies they have on hand.  Tom will provide a hat box with all the tools and materials needed for each student.  This class has some down time while waiting for processes to complete.  To fill this time, students may bring a hat in need of repair and/or plan to make a second hat as time permits.

Tom Hirt

Tom Hirt

Tom Hirt is old-fashioned guy who does things the old fashioned way.  You might call him a throw-back to a bygone era-that time when h and cowboys and craftsmen took care of business with their hands.  Hirt continues that tradition to this day as a hat maker who makes superior-quality beaver felt hats one at a time by hand.  Known as the hat maker for the movies, he has designed hats for many famous clients including Val Kilmer, Sam Elliot, and Sharon Stone.  His credits include Tombstone, the Quick and the Dead, Conagher, and many others.  After almost 20 years, he is considered one of the West’s most notable and most established hatters.  Hats of the West or email Tom at info@tomhirt.com  719-372-9399

 

 

 

 

 

Students will need to register no later than May 11th in order for Tom to get the materials he will need for the class. Students should contact Tom at the number above to get a complete list of other supplies [at students expense] they need to bring and provide their hat size for ordering the block, etc.  Students will reimburse Tom for the cost of supplies and should contact him for pricing and to provide hat size information.

Introduction to Beekeeping

February 3, 10 and 17, 2018 from 9 a.m. to noon each day

Total cost for all three classes is $60.  Included educational materials and a trip.

Trinidad State Junior College Campus, Berg Building, Room 401

Bee hive with beesSession one (February 3).  Learn the origin of bees and an overview of the European honey bee and where it fits in the world of bees.  There are different races of bees — which is right for you?  The unique biology of bees, what jobs do bees have in the hive and who’s in charge?

Session two (February 10).  Essential equipment needed for beekeepers, when and where to order your bees to get your hive started.  What does a beekeeper do?  Dealing with problems including Colony Collapse Disorder, parasites, predators, pathogens, pesticides and nutrition.

Session three (February 17).  Beekeeping through the seasons, ranging from feeding bees to harvesting honey.  Ways to nurture your bees and the economics of beekeeping.  Since February is too cold to work a hive, we’ll provide opportunities for students to visit an apiary and “work the bees” in April an/or May.  This lesson covers safety, review of equipment, hive placement and more.

Contact Donna Haddow to register at 719 846-5724 or donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu.

The instructor if Jim Conley.  He’s a former Huerfano County Extension Agent and a retired International Development Specialist with the USDA’s Foreign Agriculture Service.

box made of oak

Wooden Boxes

Wooden Boxes
July 9 – 13, 2018  $300

clint litseyContinuing Education Only – not for college credit
This class covers hand tool sharpening as well as machine techniques and use. The class focuses on corner construction used to build display cases, pistol boxes and fine toolboxes. Students will takes completed projects home.

Clint Litsey is a lifetime hobby woodworker. Clint’s main focus is chest and box construction. Clint also builds a few tables and some church furniture.

Required Tools
Safety glasses
Combination square
Utility knife
Mallet or hammer
Phillips screwdrivers
Measuring tape

powder horn

Advanced Scrimshaw

Advanced Scrimshaw Techniques
July 23 – 27, 2018  $300
Continuing Ed only – not for college credit

Learn advanced scrimshaw techniques one-on-one with Jim Stevens. You do not need an interest in Gunsmithing to take this course. The techniques taught are the same for anyone wanting to learn how to create beautiful scrimshaw. This course goes beyond basic scrimshaw into areas of specialized tool making, colored scrimshaw, carving, and even scrimshaw inlay art. The world of scrimshaw covers a much broader range of art than just etching images in black ink. This is an intensive, hands-on course taught by artist, sculptor, and scrimshander Jim Stevens.

Jim Stevens with studentJim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has three books published on scrimshaw techniques and has been commissioned to create works for collectors throughout the world. He is a Kennedy Center Registered VSA Artist in both the visual and literary arts and brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude to inspire all who attend his classes. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Pre-Requisite: Scrimshaw class or consent of instructor.

Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has been commissioned to create works of art for collectors throughout the world. Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude with him to inspire all who attend his classes, paving the way for all to express themselves in a media that warms the soul. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Visit Jim’s website at http://scrimshawstudio.com/ or email Jim at stevens@scrimshawstudio.com

Tool List
One hobby knife handle (ie: X-Acto knife) (with rubber grip if you prefer)
Package of 5, #11 hobby knife blades
69
One small tube of Titanium White artist’s oil paint
One small tube of Ivory Black artist’s oil paint
Mechanical pencil with fine-point HB lead
One #2 pencil
One black aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
One white aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
One pencil sharpener (small hand held type)
One roll of transparent tape
One pair of scissors
One pink eraser
A clear plastic ruler (6 inches long is fine)
One small can of spray adhesive
One small can of artist’s spray fixative
One small bottle of rubbing alcohol
One small pair of pliers
One small sharpening stone
Three sheets each of #400 and #600 wet/dry sandpaper
One small package of .0000 steel wool
One paper dust mask (to use while sanding and polishing)
Safety glasses or goggles (required in school’s tool shops)
One small package of facial tissue
One package of assorted fine point, hand sewing needles
One small package of cotton swabs (Q-tip or other brand)
One double-ended reversible pin vise (one end with zero minimum capacity)
*Hand-held rotary tool with small selection of ball burrs
**Headband Magnifier
*Rotary Tool Note: There are many brands of rotary tools with Dremel probably being the best-known name brand, but there are other brands out there and as long as you are comfortable with it, whichever one you choose will be fine. You don’t need an expensive one. Also, you only need a small selection of smaller ball burrs for your rotary tool. You can find them in sets of 5 to 10 for a reasonable price.
**Headband Magnifier Note: For those buying one for the first time, Opti-visors headband magnifiers are a popular choice and one of the few that come with a choice of lenses. Lens powers are designated by the numbers 3,5,7, and10. A #3 lens is 1x magnification and allows you to work about 14 inches from your material. Not much bending, but frankly not much help either. A #5 is 2x magnification and allows you to work about 8 inches from your material. I find this is fine for most work. A #10 gives 3x magnification but only about 4 inches of work distance. This is great for minute details but can be hard on the back over long periods of time. I use a #5 Opti-visor lens for general work and switch to a #10 for those times when I need the extra power for very fine details. I guess the best advice I can give new buyers is to get what you think will work the best for you and what fits your budget. Other types of magnification include microscopes, thread counters, combination lamp/magnifiers, jewelers loupes, binocular loupes and other types of magnifiers during the
course. If you already use any of these magnifiers (or another) and are comfortable and enjoy using what you have, go ahead and bring it.

Scrimshaw

Scrimshaw

July 16 – 20, 2018
$300.00 or 2 credit hours
(course counts toward the Gunsmithing Fine Arts Certificate)

Learn the Art of Scrimshaw one-on-one with Jim Stevens. You do not need an interest in Gunsmithing to take this course. The techniques taught are the same for anyone wanting to learn how to create beautiful scrimshaw on ivory, resins, and powder horns. An intensive, hands-on course taught by artist, sculptor, and scrimshander Jim Stevens. Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has three books published on scrimshaw techniques, has been commissioned to create works for collectors throughout the world, and is a Kennedy Center Registered VSA Artist in both the visual and literary arts. Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude to inspire all who attend his classes. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.

 

Jim Stevens with student

Jim Stevens with student

Jim Stevens is a world-renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has been commissioned to create works of art for collectors throughout the world. Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude with him to inspire all who attend his classes, paving the way for all to express themselves in a media that warms the soul. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.
Visit Jim’s website or email Jim at stevens@scrimshawstudio.com

 

 

SCRIMSHAW TOOL/SUPPLY LIST
The most expensive item on the following list is less than $40. I have purchased everything on the list and spent less than $100. All the items are small enough to carry in your luggage (don’t pack liquids or aerosol cans) but it is still easier to buy what you can from the College supply store. Everyone will be given time on our first day to go to the supply store and purchase materials.
The College has a first-class tool, art and office supply store on campus. It is called “The Trek-Inn Bookstore”, phone 719-846-5610. Their prices seem to be equal to or less than prices on the outside. Also, buying at the school store can definitely save you a lot of shopping or packing time. You can even give them a call ahead of time and let them know what you need so you can be assured they will have what you want when you arrive. If you already have any of these items, bring them. There’s no need to repeat your purchases.

Where to shop, source index:
(You can always order materials from the Internet if you prefer.) a=school store, b=local art store or jewelry supply store or hardware store, c=local supermarket, d=local department store (like Walmart or Kmart)
MATERIALS FOR SCRIMSHAW
Source Item
a, b One hobby knife handle (ie: X-Acto knife) (with rubber grip if you prefer)
a, b Package of 5, #11 hobby knife blades
a, b One small tube of Titanium White artist’s oil paint
a, b One small tube of Ivory Black artist’s oil paint
a,b One #2 pencil
a, b One black aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
a, b One white aquarellable pencil (Stabilo or other brand)
a, b One pencil sharpener (small hand held type)
a, b One roll of transparent tape
a, b One pair of scissors
a, b One pink eraser
a, b A clear plastic ruler (6 inches long is fine)
a, b One small can of spray adhesive
a, b One small bottle of rubbing alcohol
a, b One small pair of pliers
a, b One headband magnifier (ie: Opti-visor) (see note below)
a, b Three sheets each of #400 and #600 wet/dry sandpaper
a, b One package of .0000 steel wool pads
a, b One paper dust mask (to use while sanding and polishing)
a, b Safety glasses or goggles (required in school’s tool shops)
c, One small package of facial tissue
c, One package of assorted fine point, hand sewing needles
c, One small package of cotton swabs (Q-tip or other brand)
d, One small flexible-neck desk lamp. (see lighting note below)
a, b One double-ended reversible pin vise (one end with zero minimum capacity)
The Scrimshaw in-class fee is $12. This covers the cost of ivory, Tagua vegetable ivory, cattle horn, black buffalo horn, and other materials that I will have on hand for special in-class projects. This is the only in-class fee. I will have all these materials on hand when you arrive.
Headband Magnifier Note: If you have one, bring it. For those buying one for the first time, Opti-visors headband magnifiers are one of the few that come with a choice of lenses. Lens powers are designated by the numbers 3,5,7, and10. A #3 lens is 1x magnification and allows you to work about 14 inches from your material. Not much bending, but frankly not much help either. A #5 is 2x magnification and allows you to work about 8 inches from your material. I find this is fine for most work. A #10 gives 3x magnification but only about 4 inches of work distance. This is great for minute details but can be hard on the back over long periods of time. I use a #5 Opti-visor lens for general work and switch to a #10 for those times when I need the extra power for very fine details. I guess the best advice I can give new buyers is to get what you think will work the best for you and what fits your budget.
Other Types of Magnification: We will talk about opti-visors, microscopes, thread counters, combination lamp/magnifiers, jewelers loupes, binocular loupes and other types of magnifiers during the course. If you already use any of these magnifiers (or another) and are comfortable and enjoy using what you have, go ahead and bring it.
Lighting (desk lamp note): Our classroom has good overhead light, however you’ll soon learn that you need additional lighting on your bench. This is why a desk lamp is on the materials list. Your lamp should have a flexible neck and use a regular incandescent or low power tungsten bulb. What you want is a lamp whose light can be positioned at a very low angle to the bench, with the back of the lamp pointed towards you while reflecting light off the material you are working on.
Other Items: (Not required but nice. Bring them if you can.) Plastic box for your tools and supplies. Notebook and pen (For taking notes during discussions). Seat cushion for your stool (they are hard). Three old hand towels (to pad your work and your elbows and for wiping your fingers). Also bring any additional tools and/or supplies you feel you may want or need, any artwork or pictures you would like to work from, and a file folder for holding handouts.
Scrimshaw Class Final Project: For your final project you will need to purchase and bring with you the material you want to use. If you do not bring your own material for your final project, you may select from what I will have on hand.
I have no business relationship with them, but The Boone Trading Company is a reputable company that has any material you may want for your final project. Their number is 1-800-423-1945. Your final piece should be a belt buckle, pendant, money clip, or similar item. I recommend a flat blank rather than a domed cabochon, since domed cabochons are harder for beginners, but a domed cabochon will still be okay if that is what you prefer. Also, for pendants, order a pendant at least 30-40mm in length.

Red hot Damascus billet

Damascus Billet Making

Damascus Billet Making

June 25 – 29, 2018
$380

Steve Rollert

Instructor Steve Rollert

Knife made from Damascus steel

Damascus steel knife

Continuing education only – not for college credit
This class is a hands on class for the students. This class will be focused on the making of Damascus (pattern welded) steel for use in gun hardware and knife blades. Each student should finish the class with at least one billet of Damascus steel to take home.
This focus of this class is to teach “dry welding” technique, that is the making of Damascus steel using no flux. This approach provides steel of much greater consistency and strength. We will be using gas forges to weld our steel not coal. Subjects covered will include: Dry vs. Wet forge welding, steel selection, tool selection, use of power equipment such as power hammers and forging presses, pattern development, heat treating and etching.
Steve Rollert has been a knife maker and Damascus bladesmith for 38 years.

 

Tool list
Safety glasses
Respirator either dust mask or double filter (preferred)
Work apron Baseball or other brimmed hat
Hearing protection
Welding gloves
One pair large vice grips
Hammers – cross pein and ball pein of about 1.5 to 2.5 pound in weight
Grinding belts – 2 each in 60, 220, 400 grit – Zircon or ceramic recommended but aluminum oxide is acceptable but will not wear as long, size: 2 inch by 72 inch in length
Please bring a refillable water bottle since we will be working around hot forges in June

red hot forge

Basic Bladesmithing

Basic Bladesmithing
June 18 – 22, 2018
$380

Knife grindingContinuing Education only – not for college credit
This class will cover the forging and grinding of both full and hidden tang blades to shape. We will cover steel selection, tool considerations, different forging approaches, several heat treating techniques, and basic finishing techniques.
Steve Rollert has been a knife maker and Damascus bladesmith for 38 years.

 

 

Tool list
Safety glasses
Respirator either dust mask or double filter (preferred)
Work apron
Baseball or other brimmed hat
Hearing protection
Welding gloves
One pair large vice grips
Hammers – cross pein, and ball pein of about 1.5 to 2.5 pound in weight
Grinding belts 2 each in 60, 220, 400 grit, zircon or ceramic recommended but aluminum oxide is acceptable, but will not wear as long, size: 2 inch by 72 inch in length.
Please bring a refillable water bottle since we will be working around hot forges and in June weather.
Steel is provided by the instructor.

leather rifle scabbard

Gun Leather II

Gun Leather II
$300
June 18 – 22, 2018

Does not include leather, which you will need to purchase when you arrive
Continuing Ed only – not for college credit

 

Bob Calkins

Bob Calkins

Gun leather II was created to expand methods and techniques learned by students in Basic Holster making.
This class will take students to the next level of gun leather constructions. Students will review principles
learned in Basic Holster making with emphasis on development of a gun belt, holster, and associated leather for
a complete gun rig. The remainder of the class will give students the latitude to develop projects of their choice
associated with guns, knives, and cartridge retention. Students will be required to provide their own firearms
and knives for project development.
Robert (Bob) Calkins is an active shooter, hunter and firearms collector who has made gun leather for himself,
friends, and customers for over 50 years. In 1990, he and his wife, LaVon, decided to establish 3 Cross Custom
Gunleather as a part-time business. Upon retiring from the Department of the Interior in 1994, gun leather became a fulltime
occupation. Bob crafts gun rigs for cowboy competitors, which has included State, National, and World Champion
shooters. Hunters, outdoorsmen, casual shooters, and concealed-carry holders, make up the balance of his business.
At age 75, Bob has cut back on working hours, but still produces several holsters and gun belts every week. In his
opinion, there are numerous good leather craftsmen. However, he believes an individual with a true appreciation of
firearms and their use is essential to building a truly functional piece of gun leather.
Bob Calkins 505-598-0208 (h) 505-716-3231 (c) or three.cross@hotmail.com

Gun Leather Tool List
Quality leather will be made available to students. Contact the instructor to determine what he needs to bring so you can successfully complete your projects.
Needles, thread, oil, stamping tools, etc. will be furnished at no charge by the instructor.
 ¼” light weight electric drill
 Dremel tool with sanding drums
 Clear safety glasses
 Sponge and quart size water container (large butter tub is great)
 Straight edge ruler
 16: x 20” piece of ¾” plywood with smooth side
 Exacto knife with blades
 Rawhide #4 Mallet (such as Tandy #3300-04)
 Craft Tool Leather Shears (such as Tandy #3050-00)
 Grooving tool (such as Tandy 8074-00)
 Edging tool (such as Tandy #8077-03 or Osborne #127-4 preferred)
 Craft tool Overstitcher #6 (such as Tandy 8079-06)
 #14 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-14)
 #9 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-9)
 12” x 12” Granite piece (minimum 1” thick)

Student engraves metal

Advanced Hand Engraving

Advanced Hand Engraving

June 11 – 15, 2018

$380 or 3 credit hours

metal engraving example**Note** In order for this course to meet the requirements for the Gunsmithing Arts Certificate, classes will run longer each day. Students should report for orientation at 8 a.m. Monday morning. Dr. Pierson will discuss extended class time at the beginning of the course.
(This course counts toward the Gunsmithing Fine Arts Certificate)

This course covers advanced concepts and skills related to push engraving and hammer and chisel engraving. Special emphasis will be placed on scroll types, precious metal inlay, bulino and banknote engraving, restoring engraving, and lettering. Students should complete the Introductory Hand Engraving course prior to enrolling Advanced Hand Engraving.
Dr. Michael J. Pierson has been an academic administrator and taught technical subjects in a university setting for over 35 years. He has been engraving for 24 years, was trained by Frank Hendricks, and is a member of the Firearms Engraver’s Guild of America. He is proficient with both the hammer and chisel and pneumatic engraving techniques and a wide variety scroll patterns.

Advanced Hand Engraving
Tool List
Required tools and supplies:
1. Chasing hammer, 1-1/8″ face from NGraver or GRS
2. Four 3/32” carbalt XD blanks from Lindsay
3. #7, #12, #20 straight liners in standard width from NGraver or #18-10 and #24-10 straight liners from GRS
4. Steel ruler, 6 inch
5. Dividers
6. Scribe
7. Ellipse template #20750 from Drafting Steals
8. Circle template #20724 from Drafting Steals
9. Stabilio # 8008 pencilfrom Amazon
10. Curved burnisher from Amazon
11. Dot punch set, No. 1,2,3 from NGraver or beading tool #10, #15, and #22 from GRS
12. Optivisor, #3 lens from GRS
13. Talcum powder
14. Clear packaging tape
15. Money clip, nickel silver spring tempered from Ngraver
16. One tube of oil based black etching ink from Faust or Eckersleys
17. Stainless tool holder for 3/32” graver blanks from Lindsay
18. Wet/dry silicon carbide sandpaper (220,320, & 400 grit)
19. Palm push adjustable length graver from Lindsay
20. 3/16” brass punch from MSC
21. 3/16” steel punch from MSC
22. Carbide bur set #004-511 from GRS
Contact information for tool and supply sources:
GRS Tools Ngraver Company
Lindsay Engraving
Rudolph Faust, Inc.
Eckersley’s Arts and Crafts
MSC Industrial Supply

Leather holsters

Leather Holster Making

Leather Holster Making

June 11 – 15, 2018
$300

Does not include leather, which you will need to purchase when you arrive (see tool list below)
Continuing Ed Only – not for college credit

Holster from leather class

Holster Making

This class was created to teach students how to construct quality gun leather using methods and techniques requiring a minimum number of leather tools. Since the work is by hand (no sewing machines, etc.) reasonable hand strength and dexterity is necessary for class participation.
Students will learn the methods I used to design, layout, stitch, wet mold, edge, burnish, apply oil or antique finish, and basket stamp holsters. As the class progresses, each student will construct two holsters for guns of their choice. I would suggest a pancake holster for a semi auto (model 1911’s are great) as well as a revolver holster of either a conventional or western design. You will have the opportunity to basket stamp one of these holsters if you so desire. Students may wish to bring two personal handguns to use in constructing these holsters (no scoped handguns, please). If time permits, we will discuss construction of gun belts, cartridge loop sewing, magazine cases, saddle scabbards, and knife sheaths.

Instructor Robert (Bob) Calkins is an active shooter, hunter and firearms collector who has made gun leather for himself, friends, and customers for over 50 years. In 1990, he and his wife, LaVon, decided to establish 3 Cross Custom Gunleather as a part-time business. Upon retiring from the Department of the Interior in 1994, gun leather became a full-time occupation. Bob crafts gun rigs for cowboy competitors, which has included State, National, and World Champion shooters. Hunters, outdoorsmen, casual shooters, and concealed-carry holders, make up the balance of his business.
At age 75, Bob has cut back on working hours, but still produces several holsters and gun belts every week. In his opinion, there are numerous good leather craftsmen. However, he believes an individual with a true appreciation of firearms and their use is essential to building a truly functional piece of gun leather.

Bob Calkins 505-598-0208 (h) 505-716-3231 (c) or three.cross@hotmail.com

Leather Holster Making Tool List
Quality leather will be made available to students for an additional fee.  Contact the instructor with a description of the projects you’d like to make.

Needles, thread, oil, stamping tools, etc. will be furnished at no charge by the instructor.
 ¼” light weight electric drill
 Dremel tool with sanding drums
 Clear safety glasses
 Sponge and quart size water container (large butter tub is great)
 Straight edge ruler
 16: x 20” piece of ¾” plywood with smooth side
 Exacto knife with blades
 Rawhide #4 Mallet (such as Tandy #3300-04)
 Craft Tool Leather Shears (such as Tandy #3050-00)
 Grooving tool (such as Tandy 8074-00)
 Edging tool (such as Tandy #8077-03 or Osborne #127-4 preferred)
 Craft tool Overstitcher #6 (such as Tandy 8079-06)
 #14 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-14)
 #9 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-9)
 12” x 12” Granite piece (minimum 1” thick)

engraving example

Hand Engraving

Introductory Hand Engraving

June 4 – 8, 2018

$380 or 3 credit hours

**Note**  In order for this course to meet the requirements for the Gunsmithing Arts Certificate, classes will run longer each day.  Students should report for orientation at 8 a.m. Monday morning.  Dr. Pierson will discuss extended class time at the beginning of the course.

(This course counts toward the Gunsmithing Fine Arts Certificate)

 

Student engraves metalThis course covers basic concepts and skills related to hammer and chisel engraving.  Special emphasis will be placed on tool sharpening, pattern theory, designing, transferring, and cutting patterns.

Dr. Michael J. Pierson has been an academic administrator and taught technical subjects in a university setting for over 35 years.  He has been engraving for 24 years, was trained by Frank Hendricks, and is a member of the Firearms Engraver’s Guild of America.  He is proficient with both the hammer and chisel and pneumatic engraving techniques and a wide variety scroll patterns.

 

 

Required tools and supplies:

  1. Chasing hammer, 1-1/8″ face from NGraver or GRS
  2. Four 3/32” carbalt XD blanks from Lindsay
  3. #7, #12, #20 straight liners in standard width from NGraver or #18-10 and #24-10 straight liners from GRS
  4. Steel ruler, 6 inch
  5. Dividers
  6. Scribe
  7. Ellipse template #20750 from Drafting Steals
  8. Circle template #20724 from Drafting Steals
  9. Stabilio # 8008 pencilfrom Amazon
  10. Curved burnisher from Amazon
  11. Dot punch set, No. 1, 2, 3 from NGraver or beading tool #10, #15, and #22 from GRS
  12. Optivisor, #3 lens from GRS
  13. Talcum powder
  14. Clear packaging tape
  15. Money clip, nickel silver spring tempered from Ngraver
  16. One tube of oil based black etching ink from Faust or Eckersleys
  17. Stainless tool holder for 3/32” graver blanks from Lindsay
  18. Wet/dry silicon carbide sandpaper (220,320, & 400 grit)
  19. Palm push adjustable length graver from Lindsay
  20. 3/16” brass punch from MSC
  21. 3/16” steel punch from MSC
  22. Carbide bur set #004-511 from GRS

 

Contact information for tool and supply sources:

GRS Tools
Ngraver Company

Lindsay Engraving

Rudolph Faust, Inc.

Eckersley’s Arts and Crafts

MSC Industrial Supply

 

OUTLINE OF COURSE CONTENT:

  1. Engraving tools
  2. Types
  3. Sharpening
  4. Pattern theory
  5. Spiral type
  6. Circular
  7. Elliptical
  8. Spiral characteristics
  9. Corridor type
  10. True corridors
  11. Holding corridor
  12. Relationship to other spirals
  13. Common stem spirals
  14. Overlaid spirals
  15. Spiral measurements
  16. Spiral height
  17. Corridor height
  18. Extension length
  19. Standoff
  20. Number of turns
  21. Angle of departure
  22. Leaf anatomy
  23. Leaf types
  24. Adjacent
  25. Separated
  26. Leaf parts
  27. Sweeps
  28. Buds
  29. Lobes
  30. Leaf measurements
  31. Leaf height
  32. Stem thickness
  33. Sweep height
  34. Bud height
  35. Leaf meter
  36. Leaf width
  37. Leaf separation

III.       Designing patterns

  1. Selecting scroll style
  2. Laying out the pattern
  3. Outline the panel
  4. Establish the panel’s center line
  5. Draw planning circles
  6. Establish point of origination
  7. Establish scroll height, corridor height, and rate of turn
  8. Cutting patterns
  9. Hammer and chisel or chasing method
  10. Borders
  11. Lining
  12. Backgrounds
  13. Flush
  14. Relief
  15. Transfer plates
  16. Transfer techniques

 

Hatmaking

Hatmaking June 4-8, 2018

 $300

Continuing Education only — not for college credit

Students will learn to use the equipment and techniques to make a hat with products that most people have or can readily get from home.  Students will learn how to shape the hat by hand, ironing of the brim, sizing and hand cutting of the brim, hand pouncing and hand finishing the crown. If time allows, the class may touch on hat binding and trim by hand.  Students will leave class with a completed hat and the skills needed to practice what they learned at home and make additional hats with supplies they have on hand.  Tom will provide a hat box with all the tools and materials needed for each student.  This class has some down time while waiting for processes to complete.  To fill this time, students may bring a hat in need of repair and/or plan to make a second hat as time permits.

Tom Hirt

Tom Hirt

Tom Hirt is old-fashioned guy who does things the old fashioned way.  You might call him a throw-back to a bygone era-that time when h and cowboys and craftsmen took care of business with their hands.  Hirt continues that tradition to this day as a hat maker who makes superior-quality beaver felt hats one at a time by hand.  Known as the hat maker for the movies, he has designed hats for many famous clients including Val Kilmer, Sam Elliot, and Sharon Stone.  His credits include Tombstone, the Quick and the Dead, Conagher, and many others.  After almost 20 years, he is considered one of the West’s most notable and most established hatters.  Hats of the West or email Tom at info@tomhirt.com  719-372-9399

 

 

 

 

 

Students will need to register no later than May 11th in order for Tom to get the materials he will need for the class. Students should contact Tom at the number above to get a complete list of other supplies [at students expense] they need to bring and provide their hat size for ordering the block, etc.  Students will reimburse Tom for the cost of supplies and should contact him for pricing and to provide hat size information.

 

Ornate engraved bracelet

Master Engraving

June 18-22 and June 25-29, 2018

$1,100  Must take both weeks of classes

This course will cover:

  • Different methods and treatments of sculpture engraving.
  • Emphasis will be placed on scroll engraving and sculpturing the scroll
  • Drawing and layout of the scroll
  • Sculpturing with punches and/or carving with various gravers or burrs
  • Back ground removal and treatment will be discussed and demonstrated
Master Engraver Jim Blair

Master Engraver Jim Blair

Jim Blair started his engraving quest in the 70’s. Acquiring the skills and opportunity to open his own studio in the early 1990’s. He has previously taught engraving courses at Trinidad State Junior College, NRA summer program, Buffalo Bill Museum in Cody, Wyo. and presently provides private instruction in his own studio. Jim has attained the status of master engraver in the Firearms Guild of American and the American Custom Gunmakers Guild, with articles published in several books and magazines.  Not for beginners.

For complete information contact Donna at 719-846-5724 or donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu

http://www.jimblairengraving.com/firearms

Fresh vegetables

Backyard Organic Gardening (series)

From Paper to Plant – How to Design and Execute Your Ideal Garden
Saturday, March 17, 2018
2-5 p.m.
Trinidad State – Berg 401Fresh radishes
Discover the secrets of a successful backyard vegetable garden through self-evaluation, planning and thoughtful execution. With the proper plan, all gardeners, beginner and adept, will save time and money allowing for more time to enjoy the garden and it’s bounty!

Getting a Head-Start on the Season – How to Grow and Transplant Seedlings Using a Greenhouse
Saturday, March 24, 2018
2-5 p.m.
Trinidad State – Berg 401
Learn how to grow healthy seedlings using a greenhouse and other methods as well as how to successfully transplant them into the garden. Gain hands-on experience as we discuss greenhouse maintenance and growing outdoors during the cool season.From the Ground Up – Improving the Soil for a Healthy,

Resilient Garden Using Compost
Tuesday, April 10, 2018
6-8 p.m.
Trinidad State – Berg 401
We often fail to realize how complicated and mysterious our soils really are and how much they contribute to a gardener’s success. This class will shed some light on the connection between soil life and plant vitality while also showing the many methods of composting and several ways of putting it to good use.

Urban Permaculture – Building Self-Sufficient, Regenerative Home and Garden Systems that Mimic Nature
Tuesday, April 19, 2018
6-8 p.m.
Trinidad State – Berg 401
Permaculture, on one hand an abbreviation of permanent agriculture, on the other, permanent culture, is a design science for creating and implementing enduring food and cultural systems. The principles of Permaculture have been used not only on farms, but in the planning of businesses, school curriculum, and state policies to improve efficiency and reduce ecological impacts.

Catching the Rain – Methods for Harvesting, Storing, and Using Rain
Saturday, May 5, 2018
3-5 p.m., The Good Food Project Organic Farm
Make the most of the rainy season by saving it for a sunny day. Learn how to take advantage of water flows on the house and yard for increased fertility, security, fire safety, and storm water management.

Starting a Small Organic Farm Business – Strategies and Resources to Ensure Success
Saturday, March 19, 2018
2-6 p.m.
Trinidad State – Berg 401
Many individuals today are enjoying the benefits of self-employment on small farms across America with the growing number of health conscious food buyers. With imagination, a plan, and a few good business skills, having a farm can be rewarding and a lot of fun. Learn how to build a business plan, gain funds, perform marketing research, brand development, ongoing management and more.

Organic Disease & Pest Control – Using Nature as an Ally
Thursday, June 7, 2018
6-8 p.m.
Trinidad State – Berg 401
Why fight a loosing battle to nature when working with it can be cheaper, easier and better for the environment? When gardening organically, we often overlook the many convenient, inexpensive, and harmless plant-based pesticide/herbicides out there. What’s more, we often overlook nature’s answer to an abundance of something; something bigger that will eat it. Learn how to use biology to keep your garden in check from harmful pests and diseases as well as methods to keep your plants healthy, increasing resilience.

Composting 101 – The Science and Art of Decay
Saturday, June 23, 2018
3-5 p.m.
Trinidad State – Berg 401
Building the soil, as a gardener, is the most important part of growing good, nutrient packed, fast growing food. There are many ways of turning food wastes and other organic materials into wholesome, living compost from making a pile, to using worms and chickens. Learn how to build a simple compost bin and the multiple ways the finished product can be used for happy veggies.

From Field to Plate – Wholesome Cooking with Ingredients Fresh from the Garden
Thursday, July 12, 2018
6-8 p.m., TBD
Biting into the first carrot or cabbage of the season is a gardener’s greatest reward. Using produce creatively in the kitchen is a fantastic way to stay connected to your food and healthy. Learn about the nutritional benefits of growing vegetables and how you can combine and cook them for a delicious, nutrient rich diet.

Saturday, July 21, 2018
3-6 p.m.
The Good Food Project
While the warm weather and abundant growth may make a gardener want to rest on their laurels, with a little extra input of planning and work, we can grow a second round of quite a few cool season crops. Enjoy time on an organic farm and gain hands on experience planting seeds, transplanting, installing row covers, and more.

About the instructor Garrett Watson: Good Food Project and Trinidad Community Gardens manager, Garrett Watson, has been growing food and gaining experience in the garden for over 20 years. Having grown up on a small farm and ranch, he has worked as a city horticultural assistant, a dairy farm herd manager, and a sales associate and volunteer for the largest organic farm in Louisiana. With a strong passion for good, quality food and a diverse background in sustainable gardening and land management, Garrett combines techniques learned along the way to deliver helpful, applicable, and fresh approaches to the home kitchen garden to help save time, money, and the world.

 

Each class costs $20.  The deadline to register is three business days before the class begins.  To register call Donna at 719 846-5724 or donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu