Plein Air Painting

July 18 and 19, 2016 in Trinidad

Translate the landscape into a beautiful painting using color and light.  Color value, design/composition and color relationships will be discussed.

  • Individual help at each easel
  • A demo by Donna Bland on color mixing
  • A demo on shadow and value

“Come join me in a relaxed environment to enhance the learning experience.”

Workshop Details

  • Price $135, plus a fee of $12.85
  • Maximum number of students is 12
  • 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Daily
  • Experience level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Mediums: Oil and Acrylic

 

To make a reservation contact Donna Haddow donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu

Phone 719 846-5541 or 800 621 TSJC ext. 5541

donnabland.com

 

Supply List for Landscape Painting                                

Earths

Transparent Red Oxide

Burnt Sienna

Raw Umber

Yellow Ochre

 

Yellows

Cadmium Yellow Lemon or Light

Cadmium Yellow Medium

 

Reds

Cadmium Red Medium

Quinacridone Red or Rose

Alizarin Permanent

 

Blues

Ultramarine Blue

Cobalt

 

Orange, Green and Violet

Cadmium Orange

Quinacridone Violet

Viridian

Sap Green

 

Black and White

Titanium White* – I prefer Permalba White

Black: Chromatic Black

Brushes

#2 and #4 Round, #3 and #14 Bright, #6 and #8 Flats

Easel

Canvas   11×14, 12 x 16, or 16 x 20   Any size Artist is comfortable with, 3 canvas of any size

Paper towels

Odorless Turpenoid

Contact:  artspeaks4u@gmail.com      for Supply List Questions

Donna Bland

Donna Bland lives and paints in the Austin, Texas area.  She has been an artist all her life starting in kindergarten.  Painting daily in her studio, plein air or teaching a workshop, subjects are unlimited.  Donna loves to learn, create and share what she has experienced in finishing a painting.  No words to describe the joy in painting outdoors in the Texas Hill Country, Colorado or Mexico.

My passion is creating an oil painting that reminds someone of a special moment, place or person in their lives.

When she first started painting in Georgia,  Donna was taught to paint scenes that interested her.  Painting what interest her adds a feeling of excitement into her painterly strokes.  Painting outdoors (en Plein Aire) is a wonderful way to study light and shadow as the day unfolds.  Painting a portrait is especially fun because I get to know the people or create a scene from a person’s life.  “From outdoor scenes, to portraits, to still life – I love it all,”    Each canvas is the opportunity to create a new design made of various colors and shapes.  It is  truly a blessing to be an artist and share people’s experiences, culture and dreams through art.

She formally studied art at The Student Art League of New York, Scottsdale School of Art, University of Georgia and Tyler Jr. College in Texas.  And, has been fortunate to paint with modern day masters throughout the United States as well as Europe.   Continuing to study and read works by John Singer Sargent, Nicolai Fechin, Joaquin Sorolla and Emile Gruppe’ lends its influence in her work.

Frank (Buddy) Knight

Frank {Buddy} Knight was raised on a ranch south of Marfa, Texas and learned from his father and grandfather to appreciate quality gear. Early on he wanted to work with his hands and spur making was a perfect fit. He built his first pair of spurs in the Vocational Agriculture Shop at Marfa High School when he was fourteen. His work has been displayed at The Trappings of Texas in The Museum of the Big Bend at Sul Ross State University Alpine, Texas, at The Western Folk Life Center in Elko Nevada, The Cowboy Classic in Phoenix Arizona, and The Trappings on the Llano at the Llano County Historical Museum in Llano, Texas. He demonstrated spur making at the 25th Texas State Folk Life Festival at the Institute of Texan Cultures in San Antonio, Texas. Today Buddy operates a shop in Marfa, Texas. He produces bits, spurs, silver buckles, jewelry, and some ornamental iron.

Tom Hirt

Tom Hirt is old-fashioned guy who does things the old fashioned way.  You might call him a throw-back to a bygone era-that time when h and cowboys and craftsmen took care of business with their hands.  Hirt continues that tradition to this day as a hat maker who makes superior-quality beaver felt hats one at a time by hand.  Known as the hat maker for the movies, he has designed hats for many famous clients including Val Kilmer, Sam Elliot, and Sharon Stone.  His credits include Tombstone, the Quick and the Dead, Conagher, and many others.  After almost 20 years, he is considered one of the West’s most notable and most established hatters.

Tom’s website

Jack Brooks

Jack Brooks was born in Colorado, graduated from Englewood High School in 1966, and attended University of Northern Colorado where he majored in chemistry (BA 1970 and MA 1972). He built his first flintlock rifle in 1971. After working four years as a chemist he began making flintlock rifles full time in 1976. Besides making new rifles, pistols, and fowlers; he began collecting and restoring antique Kentucky rifles. This gave Jack the opportunity to study firsthand the finest examples of 18th and 19th century American long rifles. His interest in Kentucky rifles began when a child with Walt Disney’s Davy Crockett TV series and John Wayne’s movie “The Alamo”. Many years later Jack, along with friends Bob Lienemann and Mike Branson, were asked to make 14 guns for the 2004 remake of “The Alamo” movie.   Jack’s work has been displayed at The Smithsonian Institute, the NRA Museum, and the Minneapolis Institute of Art. His guns have also been featured in several magazines and books. Jack has authored many magazine articles and has taught several years at the annual Gunsmith Seminar of the National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association.

Jim Stevens

Jim Stevens is a world renowned scrimshander, writer and artist. He has been commissioned to create works of art for collectors throughout the world.   Jim brings his expertise and his no-fail attitude with him to inspire all who attend his classes, paving the way for all to express themselves in a media that warms the soul. No other art form in American has a longer history. No other expression of art has such significance or influence on the American spirit.

Jim’s website